Viewing 6 posts - 37 through 42 (of 50 total)
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  • Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    An MRI would make sense.

    If you have a solid fusion in the back of the neck, this makes the front of the neck tend to fuse even in the face of a non-fusion. However, if the back and the front of the neck did not fuse, then the posterior instrumentation will not matter. There is the possibility that the posterior instrumentation is irritating a nerve root so in this case, a CT scan would be also something to consider.

    Make sure the radiologist had read and confirmed that the posterior screws are not in the way of the exiting nerve roots.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    failedACDF
    Participant
    Post count: 30

    Thanks, I will keep you posted.

    failedACDF
    Participant
    Post count: 30

    Hi Dr. Corenman,

    I had an MRI with and without contrast and the findings are similar to those of the CT scan. Relevant portions state:

    Moderate right C5-6 and mild right C6-7 neural foraminal narrowing. So this is clearly much better than prior to my surgeries. Pre-ACDF (nine months ago), both levels were severe narrowing. Pre-laminoforaminotomy (three months ago) both levels were also severe.

    Interestingly, my left on those levels is moderate/severe on one level and severe on the other, yet I have no problems on the left.

    I currently still have bad right shoulder blade and right arm pain and numbness. My surgeon would like to give it some more time to possibly resolve. I am on 1200mg a day of Neurontin.

    My questions are as follows:

    Could moderate and minor narrowing cause so much pain and numbness?

    Being that the posterior procedure based on the scans seems to have helped open up the foramina, could I heal with time? I was all better for three weeks after the second procedure, until the pain and numbness came back.

    The MRI also notes “ill-defined enhancement is seen in the soft tissue posterior to the C5-7 levels without associated fluid collection. related to postsurgical scarring.” I assume this is related to the swelling that I have there.

    Thanks

    failedACDF
    Participant
    Post count: 30

    I am actually posting something that has nothing to do with the spine. I know that you went to Wayne State for medical school and there was a very interesting article in the NY Times today describing how downtown Detroit is in many instances relying on the Wayne State Police Department. I was not able to include the link within the forum.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    When I was a medical student and resident in the ER, there were more patients handcuffed to the gurneys than not. The Wayne State police department had their hands full. There was a substation from the Detroit Police Department in the main trauma hospital.

    You can heal over time as nerve roots take quite a long time to heal. You can test to see if the diagnosis is correct by obtaining a SNRB (selective nerve root block) and obtaining temporary relief (see pain diary). The steroid application involved in the injection also can help to reduce pain.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    failedACDF
    Participant
    Post count: 30

    Thanks. I will keep you posted.

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