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  • Avatarlisaclarke
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    I had a discectomy on 10/25/19 to resolve L5-S1 herniation causing right side sciatic pain. I received instant relief, but 2 weeks after surgery felt lumbar pain and left side nerve pain down left leg. I was hospitalized for 10 days being checked for infection and so forth and managing horrendous pain. And spasms. Multiple MRI’s later, the conclusion was reherniation L5S1 and also L4L5. I had a second surgery on 1/14/20 to fix the new issues. I feel nerve pain on the left but not as bad, but the real issue is that I cannot walk yet. I’m 5 days from surgery and I use a walker but putting full weight on the left leg causes too much lower back pain. I’m trying to understand why after the first surgery I essentially walked immediately with no pain and this time is totally different.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7288

    I cannot explain why you have such severe lower back pain after a repeat microdiscectomy as that is distinctly unusual. It is not distinctly unusual to reherniate after an initial decompression surgery. It sounds like the redo surgery was successful to reduce the nerve compression. If you cannot weight your lower back, careful perusal of your MRI or even a new CT scan to look for a small fracture of your facet should be in order.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarlisaclarke
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    It turns out I had a huge hematoma pressing on all the nerves and my spine. It was removed on 1/22 but I still have too much left leg pain (nerve down buttock you shin). I can take a few steps but that’s it. I sure hope it’s just an angry nerve root. I started swimming to try and speed progress. Distressed at inability to walk.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7288

    With your symptoms and inability to walk, new imaging should be considered.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarlisaclarke
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    I saw the surgeon a few days ago. He did new imaging and observed that I could walk with a can about 30 steps with shooting pain in left buttock. He believes the nerve is bruised and because there is very slow improvement, it should continue. 3 surgeries in such a short time period and so many days in hospital makes repair slow. Other thoughts?

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7288

    If you have severe pain in your leg only with standing and walking and are always looking for a chair to sit down or lean over a counter, you could have foraminal stenosis. This occurs sometimes after a disc herniation surgery as the foramen height is made up substantially from the height of the disc. When the disc height shrinks, noted especially after a herniation and then surgery, the nerve in the foramen can get pinched with standing/walking.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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