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  • AlbertDisuza
    Member
    Post count: 26

    Effects of Poor posture
    low back pain: It is one of the most common consequences of bad posture. More than 80 per cent of neck and back problems are the result of tight, achy muscles brought on by years of bad posture. With time, there may be such changes in your muscles and ligaments that you have a chronically stiff, tight, painful feeling.

    Limited range of motion: The muscles can get permanently shortened or stretched when a slumped-over position becomes your normal position. Muscles and ligaments that have been shortened or stretched no longer function as they should.

    Increased discomfort and pain: Poor posture can often cause headaches and pain in the shoulders, arms, hands and around the eyes resulting from a forward-head position. Rounded shoulders can trigger headache at the base of your skull where the shoulder muscles join.

    Creates pain in the jaw: A forward-head position can lead to jaw pain. This kind of pain (known as TMJ, temporomandibular joint disease) was once considered only a dental problem. Today we know that TMJ pain may also be caused or aggravated by faulty posture.

    Decreased lung capacity: Reducing the amount of oxygen in your body can decrease the space in your chest cavity, restricting efficient functioning of your lungs. The decreased intake of air into the lungs also requires the heart to work harder to pump the blood, which in turn creates congestion and back pressure of circulation in the pelvis and legs.

    Affects proper bowel function: Even this important bodily task may be affected by faulty posture. If your spine arches and sways forward, your intestines may sag and cause constipation.

    Accelerated degenerative changes: The likelihood of ‘wear and tear’ arthritis or what is termed degenerative osteoarthritis, in later years when poor posture is combined with limited mobility.

    Makes you look older than you are: When you are slumped over or hunched over, not standing straight, you can add years to your appearance. For women, the more rounded the shoulders, the more breasts may sag. Any woman, no matter what her age, can help reduce the sag by nearly 50 per cent by simply standing tall. Poor posture sends a message of depression, low energy and low self esteem.

    Causes you to feel chronically tired: Poor breathing and circulation, sluggish digestion, muscles constantly fighting gravity – is it any wonder that you feel fatigued all the time? Your muscles are working so hard just to hold you up that you waste energy simply standing, sitting and moving. Where’s the energy you need to feel good?

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8455

    I would love this to be fully true but unfortunately, it is partially true. The effects of gravity do create a toll on the human frame. The main problem is the thoracic kyphosis (the forward curve of the middle back or chest) advances with age. This does create greater strain on the neck and lower back. Extension exercises which most of us do not do would be helpful.

    The problem with this theory is that spines deteriorate with exercise too. SInce the discs are essentially avascular, injuries to the discs are permanent. The effects of occupation, daily living, trauma and genetics produce wear in the spine. Many patients who come into the office suffer from antalgia- the abnormal posturing of the body to prevent pain.

    If you had lumbar stenosis (see website), you would bend forward at the waist to prevent your lumbar nerves from being crushed. If you had significant symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease, you would bend backwards at the waist to unload the painful discs.

    I agree that individuals need exercise to stay healthy and posture is one of the more important items to focus on but it is not the only one that needs to be addressed.

    Dr. Corenman

    AlbertDisuza
    Member
    Post count: 26

    Thank you Dr.Corenman for your reply and views. I read your posts and it is great to hear a work from you. I totally agree that posture is not the only thing that needs to be addressed, but it is one of the issues I wanted to talk about here as it is not given its due importance. Also over doing anything, be it exercise too is definitely harmful for the back and also the body. Thank you for your feedback on the post. Appreciate it!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8455

    I do not want to play down the importance of proper exercise, both cardiovascular and postural. If all of us would participate in those activities, we would all be better off.

    Dr. Corenman

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