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  • Pinales
    Member
    Post count: 18

    A while back I wrote to you about tightness, burning, pressure in the head, neck, face, shoulders. You thought it might be C2/C3 facet joints. That is still uncertain. My question: It was suggested that I visit a chiropractor. He took many tests including temperature scan, a dual scale balance test, and x-rays. He showed me an x-ray of neck flexion where my vertebrae didn’t move at all — the chin touched the chest but the muscles were doing all the work in the forward movement. It was a very strange x-ray. Could this have been unconsciously purposeful on my part? Have you ever seen an x-ray like this? What would cause this to happen? Could this lack of movement in the vertebrae be causing my problems?

    He is suggesting 28 sessions.

    Thanks for any answers you might be willing to give.

    Judith

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8427

    From your account of your experience for this chiropractor, his or her particular specialty may not fit with what you need. Temperature differences and a dual balance scale work more with posture deformity which is not your problem. The findings on the X-rays do not make sense to me.

    In addition, you do not need to sign up for 28 visits. Chiropractic treatment of 3-5 visits should give you enough knowledge of treatment efficacy. If you don’t improve, then another form of treatment would be in order.

    Dr. Corenman

    Pinales
    Member
    Post count: 18

    Thank you for responding so quickly. It is hard to believe that a busy doctor with a full schedule of patients can care enough to be interested in those who are limited to being online. We are grateful. And I will try to be concise.

    Yes, I am a bit lopsided due to a frenetic experiment with “swivel hips” on the trampoline about 25 years ago. The temperature scan was all in the red on the left side and my shoulder, ear etc. are higher on one side than the other. That said, it has never bothered me much and I didn’t think it was so important to mention in conjunction with my head/neck problems. Maybe I was wrong. As for the neck x-ray (I asked for another today), apparently my lordoctic curve is so extreme that my neck never straightens out completely even when my chin is firmly on my chest. Is that so rare or important? (If you are curious to see a cut/paste of the straight head and bent head x-ray, I’d be glad to send them in a document attachment.)

    The neurosurgeon whom I am working with has decided to experiment with least invasive procedures first, starting with deep tissue massage. (Previously, he had ordered several nerve blocks, none of which made any difference and prescribed Xanax…ditto). I am sure he will return to the C2/C3 facet joints unless something simpler works. The insurance won’t pay for the massage unless it is done by a physician (gives me cold chills to see another physician), a physical therapist (I’ve been so many times) or a chiropractor. I chose the chiropractor and now he doesn’t want to do the massage. I’m not totally comfortable, but will continue for the moment.
    I wish you were closer.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8427

    If massage cures your headaches with a short course, that would be a good treatment investment but I am not optomistic that massage will cure you.

    I have never seen a cervical spine X-ray that locks the entire neck into lordosis with a flexion X-ray with the chin on the chest. I would say it is impossible to put the chin on the chest without flexion of the neck so there has to be some misinterpretation of the films.

    Dr. Corenman

    Pinales
    Member
    Post count: 18

    Who knows what, if anything will help. When I bend my chin to my chest, the x-ray shows a straightened, but not curved cervical spine. I have no idea how common or not common that is or if it is even relevant.

    Right now, the chiropractor is not interested in the massage, so it looks like it won’t be happening.

    I’m very unsure what to do.
    Thanks for your advice.

    Judith

    George Etzl
    Member
    Post count: 4

    Cervical lordosis can be affected drastically by X-ray positioning. A patient is told to put their chin to their chest. You and I are picturing mandible to sternum where flexion occurs over the entire cervical spine. The flexion is initially at the C0-C1 Level then the remainder of the Cervical spine follows. So the incorrect positioning is performed by having the patient flex having the tip of the mandible is placed toward the top of the sternum. (A maneuver like cervical retraction or turtle stretch.) This causes the majority of flexion to come from CO C1 and maintains lordosis. This is probably a case of incorrect positioning making it perceive a lack of motion. This can occur even without the X-ray technologist or chiropractor having touch the patient by simply using the command “Tuck” your chin into your chest. 8 times out of ten the patient will flex from the upper cervical and not lower cervical. while feeling like they are in “Full” flexion.

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