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  • Vishnu TK
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Hi doctor,my name is vishnu and i saw one of your videos on youtube about ‘how to read MRI of cervical stenosis’ i have that exact same condition as per my MRI but i have no pain or symptoms in my neck or arms, its been one year but no symptoms, condition remains the same in latest MRI also. After reading my MRI the doctor told me that i will be paralyzed if i fell down suddenly in bathroom or anywhere, surgery is required.I am very worried now. Do i really need to do the surgery without symptoms???

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8339

    If you have cervical stenosis, one of the factors is how severe the stenosis really is? Do you have any “white” fluid around the spinal cord which is CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) and a “cushion” around the cord. If there is no CSF surrounding the cord and especially if there is a white signal in the cord itself which indicates a prior injury to the cord, you should consider surgery. Now if there is no abnormal signal in the cord and your examination shows no long tract signs (hyperreflexia, Hoffman’s sign, incoordination), you have no symptoms of myelopathy (see the hyperlink below) and you don’t do activities that can place your neck as risk (motorcycling, mountain biking, skiing, fighting. etc…), then you can wait. There is a chance that if you have tight stenosis and you fall and hit your head, forcing it backwards that you could develop a cord injury.

    https://neckandback.com/conditions/cervical-central-stenosis-and-myelopathy/

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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