Viewing 6 posts - 37 through 42 (of 50 total)
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  • Avatargeorge
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    After viewing the MRI, my surgeon word were:
    “you have a recurrence, but it does not seem a severe compression, in addition the fragment seems to have a tendency to dehydration, so it may shrink over time
    if the pain is not so bad, I’d say we should wait.”

    What do you think about this approach?
    Why the recurrence happened so soon, are there any reasons for this or it just happens?
    I’m feeling hopeless right now, it’s like turning back in time with 10 months but now with a larger herniation, which scares me because I’m a very active person, I was skiing, cycling and doing all kind of physical work and activities , that’s the reason why I went for the surgery , to get rid of the pain and to be able to do all this activities again.
    What should I understand , that if the pain is not so bad I could live with it? Isn’t there a risk to get worse considering that the herniation is larger than the first time, will I be able to have an active life or,any kind of sudden move or strenouos activity might agravate the situation?

    Thank you very much for your time.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7849

    Unfortunately, recurrent herniations occur for no reason at all at about a 15% rate. I’m not as worried about the size of the recurrent HNP as your symptoms. If the pain is tolerable and you have no motor weakness, then conservative treatment can continue. If however, you have pain that you cannot tolerate or motor weakness, I would recommend a redo microdiscectomy.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatargeorge
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    Hello Dr.Corenman,

    The pain is tolerable and it doesn’t prevent me from walking, however 4 days ago I’ve started to exercise(kinetotherapy) and the pain intensified a little bit , especially when I’m sitting.Is this normal?
    If I may, I want to ask you another thing , is it possible for the herniated fragment to dehydrate, so it may shrink over time, as my surgen told me?
    Have you encountered this in your career?

    Thank you for all your answers.

    Avatarseb_nied
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Hi George!
    I see you are in a very similar situation as I am. Had a recurrent herniation after my microdiscectomy which is giving me some troubles. My doctor told me the exact same thing you wrote, that the new herniation is white in the middle meaning it has a chance to dehydrate, but if it doesn’t then it would eventually calcify and will need to be removed. I was wondering how you are in the meantime.
    Cheers,
    Sebastian

    Avatargeorge
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    Hello Sebastian,

    Sorry to hear that you are in a similar situation.
    I was waiting for doctor Corenman to reply, if he had any similar cases, if it’s really possible for the fragment do dehydrate and what exactely that means, besides the fact that it might shrink, because in my logic, if it will dehydrate that equals to calcification, but is just my assumption.
    Let’s say it will dehydrate , I was wandering if it’s safe to live with it there , what that means for the future?Maybe your surgeon answered to this kind of questions?
    I don’t know how big is your reherniation, mine is bigger than the first one,but like Dr Corenman said in previous replies , it’s important where is the herniation located in the canal, the symptoms are related to the location.
    Since I’ve wrote the last reply, my symptoms improved a little bit, I don’t know if it’s because I started to exercise or because it’s dehydrating…
    I’m planning to make another MRI in a few months to see exactely what’s going on there, I’m really affraid of another operation considering what happened.
    I hope your condition will improve ,I know it’s hard but we need to be patient for now I guess .

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7849

    Any new or recurrent fragment can dehydrate and lose some volume, reducing the compression on the root and allowing less symptomatology. The “white” within the fragment in a T2 image certainly could be water and have a better chance to lose volume (compression) but no one knows if that will happen or how long it will take. In the face of motor weakness or impairing pain, a redo microdiscectomy should be considered. If the pain is tolerable and no weakness is present, I would recommend an epidural injection which can dehydrate the disc fragment more rapidly and stabilize the pain generated by the nerve faster.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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