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  • jamie
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Hi I am mid thirties male quite active no health issues, never had a bad back or spine issue before. Last month I picked up about a 15 lb box on a shelf and felt a strain in my neck.

    It got worse over the next few days. My left hand started to get numb just pointer and thumb. Shoulder blade pain pretty bad.

    Dr sent me for ct. They told me I have a neck herniated disc on level c5/c6 with compressed spinal cord and a smaller bulge at c6,c7. I havent had any accidents,like car or anything. I play sports but not contact. I have a desk job. I have not been hard on my body at all.

    When I was younger I used to be quite a drinker with my frat buddies and fell on my ass a few times over the years. From standing height only. Would this have caused my herniated disc now in my thirties or is this something genetic.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8378

    A herniated disc can be related to prior injury but the majority are associated with genetics. The lift was unfortunately just the right bend, twist and load to tear that annulus at just the right place. That force caused the nucleus to extrude in the lateral aspect of the disc at the foramen and you now have a herniated disc that is compressing the C6 nerve.

    As long as you do not have myelopathy from cord compression (see website) or significant motor weakness (biceps and wrist extensors- important for grip), conservative care is in order- at least initially.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    jamie
    Member
    Post count: 3

    A herniated disc can be related to prior injury but the majority are associated with genetics.

    When you say it can be related to prior injury is that usually a large traumatic injury like a car accident or something of that magnitude?

    I ask because I haven’t had a drunken fall in over 2 years at least. And even after I had a fall I had no symptoms. No aches or pains ever.

    Also I have buddies of mine that have had way more falls playing contact sports specifically soccer and they have never herniated a cervical disc.

    In my case would it be more likely to be genetics?

    As long as you do not have myelopathy from cord compression (see website) or significant motor weakness (biceps and wrist extensors- important for grip), conservative care is in order- at least initially.

    So far so good at this point. No major problems that way.

    Thanks for your help Dr.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8378

    The back fibers of the annulus (the part that holds the nucleus in or the outside of the donut) are loaded and stressed with flexion (bending forward), rotation (twisting) and loading (compression). These factors can all occur at the same time with a fall onto the head. Most falls like this however do not cause a disc hernation. These falls can however tear the annulus and weaken it enough that a small motion can cause a herniation. Most herniations however are not related to a fall.

    Genetics plays a major role in most disc herniations.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    jamie
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Just making sure I am understanding you correctly Dr.

    These falls can however tear the annulus and weaken it enough that a small motion can cause a herniation.

    When you make the above statement do you mean these falls meaning falls on the head?

    Most herniations however are not related to a fall

    So even though I have had small falls this is not usually enough to have contributed to a herniation beacuse my falls were not falls on my head? Genetics is more likely?

    Im kinda playin the blame game with myself, like I Should have prevented this from happening to me.

    Thanks again.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8378

    What I have been discussing are general statements that reasonably hold true. Each situation has its own specifics and origin of injury can normally be determined with a thorough history and physical examination along with imaging.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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