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  • Avatarsol1234
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    Hi Dr. Corenman,

    I’ve appreciated your help post-op, and have had a decent recovery to my l4/l5 microdiscectomy / facectomy / hemilaminectomy performed in January. I have had some pretty severe facet joint pain on and off, but it’s off enough lately to be manageable. I’ve gotten back to mountain biking and other endurance activites.

    However, I seem to have thrown out my back two weeks ago. Two days after a very long hike I woke up and felt that familiar old feeling that used to happen 3x a year. Best way to describe it is severe weakness, with sharp pains moving from sitting to standing. All conentrated to lumbar area. A tiny bit of sciatic pain accompanies it sometimes.

    Is there a good chance this is a reherniation, or a muscle strain from overdoing it? Any suggestions in moving forward besides my usual strength exercises and stretches?

    Thank you for this service. It is especially helpful in times like this where a visit with my surgeon would be a big financial drain, but of course I will contact them if this continues. Cheers!

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7686

    You have what I call a “low back attack” which is generally a new annular tear. You feel immobilized and your back muscles “lock up” almost like you fractured your back. Occasionally these can be accompanied by a new herniation but that is not likely. You would know by the onset of buttocks/leg pain in 2-3 days after the event.

    The best way to handle these is to get a firm back brace and if tolerable, take oral steroids. These attacks calm down in a period of 5 days to two weeks. Muscle relaxers can also be useful.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarsol1234
    Participant
    Post count: 8

    Like clockwork, feeling much better at the 2 week mark. I will certainly take that advice, but is there a way to prevent these? Just stronger core exercises?

    I had a very small amount of sciatica concentrated to upper leg – could that just be from inflaming the nerve root?

    Thank you so much for your time, as always.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7686

    See the section https://www.neckandback.com/treatments/conservative-treatment-mechanical-lower-back-disorders/ to understand these disorders. Basically limit “BLT” and develop (and engage) a strong core. You’ll need to read that thread to understand “BLT”.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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