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  • AvatarAndreasDN
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Dear Dr Corenman,

    I’m currently 10 days post microdiscectomy, and allthough very happy with the immedeate sciatica relief, I’m concerned and scared about a couple of things:

    – slight stinging lower back pain (previous herniation was l5-s1) – worried about reherniation allthough I did nothing to cause this, I only walk for now (28 yo). The pain (faint but it is there) is on the same side as my previous herniation and a couple of cm next to the incision
    – a sore calf in the leg where the sciatica used to be, however I did not have calf soreness before. This ‘pain’ isn’t bad at all and not worsening, but there nonetheless

    Could you perhaps shed some light on these issues? I’m mainly concerned about the first one.

    Thanks a lot!

    Best wishes

    Andreas

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7626

    “Slight stinging lower back pain” after a microdiscectomy can be expected even if you do not have a recurrent disc herniation. Remember that you had to tear the annulus wall (the boundary between the inside and outside of the disc) Tis wall is full of pain fibers and will generate pain signals for as long as 6 months after the tear (or surgery). 10% of patients with a disc herniation might have chronic lower back pain.

    Your other complaint “a sore calf in the leg where the sciatica used to be, however I did not have calf soreness before. This ‘pain’ isn’t bad at all and not worsening, but there nonetheless” is probably a normal aftermath of a disc herniation irritating the nerve root. A small percentage of patients do get a leg blood clot (called a DVT) so make sure you don’t have a clot.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarAndreasDN
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Thanks a lot for the feedback, gave me peace of mind! I went to the GP to make sure I don’t have DVT.

    Have a nice evening,

    Best wishes,

    Andreas

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7626

    Please keep us posted of your recovery.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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