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  • Angel
    Member
    Post count: 2

    My 41 year old son diagnosed with arachnoiditis from being given eight epidural injections of depo-medrol in one day. After waking up he was in excruciating pain and has progressively gotten worse each day since January 2013. Very few doctors know about arachnoiditis. No pain medications help this condition. What hopeful suggestions can you give.
    His medical doctor never heard of arachnoiditis. She gave him pain medications like, gabapentin, elavil, for depression, morphine, however, my son every day gets progressively worse with painful paralysis and burning in his bladder, jolting and burning pains in his body and feels very hopeless, as he was very happy doing personal training. He feels his whole life is over.

    I told him to keep praying and that God would bring healing to him and not give up.

    Can you please give us any insight as to what to do? Thank you.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8460

    I am unclear why eight injections of an epidural steroid were performed. What was the reasoning?

    Arachnoiditis can occur from intradural injections (epidural means above the dura and intradural means inside the dura). If the injection inadvertently was placed inside the dura, arachnoiditis can occur.

    The reason why these injections were necessary begs the question as to why he needed them in the first place. What was his diagnosis that necessitated these epidurals?

    Arachnoiditis cannot be cured but can be treated using medications and stimulation (spinal or peripheral nerve stimulation).

    Dr. Corenman

    Angel
    Member
    Post count: 2

    It was all about money. He gave my son extra injections, 4 facet, and 4 epidurals. The doctor wanted to get paid by the insurance with the 4 epidurals. My son’s case is truly a tragedy. He thinks a spine stimulator is not that successful according to many people. He lives in constant pain. He is too ill to help is sister with a lawsuit at this time. I always tell him God will bring help. Thank you. Kathy (a very concerned mom)

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8460

    Even if you think these injections were financially motivated, there still has to be some indications as to why this doctor completed these injections. What was the suspected diagnosis that this doctor used to indicate these injections?

    Spinal cord stimulators in the right hands can be very helpful. Unfortunately, there are many individuals that are adequate but not expert in these devices. If you find someone who has great experience and is meticulous, the results can be much better.

    Dr. Corenman

    webbal
    Member
    Post count: 1

    Hello Dr. Corenman

    I am 26yrs old and I’ve recently been diagnosed with Arachnoiditis. After experiencing sudden numbness from the waist down, I was taken to A&E. The MRI scans showed evidence of the disease and was able to see the individual nerves bunched together at the L4/L5 point. I have had a previous discetomy at the L4/L5, at the age of 23yrs on May 2010.

    I’m trying to find out how serious my condition is likely to be; how probable it is to be progressive and what life changes should I make or think about ( i.e. would it be sensible for me to have kids; would I still be able to look after them after giving birth, would I be able to pick them up?). Those in the same position as me, what sort of lifestyle do they have? (Are they living an active lifestyle or bound to certain restraints?). Has anyone with this disease been able to go through labour without serious complications and has it had any impact on their condition, lifestyle? How frequently do the nerves flare up and how long do the symptoms last for? I understand that the condition varies from person to person, but someone in a similar situation as me; relevant information would be very useful in order to make very important life decisions.

    Reports and analysis taken by radiologists and by the Neurosurgeon (August 2013)

    Previous L4/5 discetomy May 2010. Little postsurgical change. No evidence of any significant recurrent disc or scar tissue causing nerve root compression.

    L5/S1, minor central disc protrusion which is indenting the thecal sac with caudal extrusion where it appears to be abutting the traversing left S1 nerve root in the lateral recess. No significant change in the previous images of 2010. No new compressive disc lesions. The neural foramina are patent throughout.

    Normal cord, conus and cauda equine.

    Conclusion: No recurrence of the L4/5 previously large compressive disc. There is a unchanged central mild L5/S1 disc protrusion which indents the thecal sac and abuts the traversing left S1 nerve root in the lateral recess.

    On an MRI scan which was perfomed by us there was no recurrence of the disc but a small bunching of the nerves suggestive of an arachnoiditis. Small dose of Dexamethasone for 3 days followed by Diclofenac. Has evidence of arachnoiditis on the MRI scan which can flare up time to time.
    I would be grateful for your time and effort to help me understand my condition well and be able to accept whatever the outcome maybe. I know there are many others who are suffering to a great extent and have immense courage to be able to face the world and carry on battling with this hidden disease, not only does my heart goes out to them but gives me hope that I may also be as brave as them.

    Yours faithfully webbal

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8460

    Arachnoiditis can occur after spine surgery as it can after a number of events. See the section on arachnoiditis on the web site.

    Normally, arachnoiditis symptoms occur with a slow onset and are chronic. It is unusual for flair-ups and remissions although I have seen that on rare occasion.

    I assume your arachnoiditis is located at L4-5 where your prior surgery was. Numbness from the waist down does not fit the symptoms expected for this disorder unless in the unlikely event that the root clumping is located high up in the lumbar spine.

    Numbness at the waist level would start with the L1 and L2 nerve roots. Again, assuming this arachnoiditis is at the L4-5 level, the L1 and L2 roots would not be involved. I would have a neurologist work with you to determine the real diagnosis is.

    Dr. Corenman

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