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  • Johns
    Member
    Post count: 5

    Hi
    I’ve had ongoing problems with back since December 2012, and despite whether there is any pain or not, I have an antalgic lean. Disc prolapsed in December, and seems to get better for 6 weeks to 2 months, and then there is a relapse, an increase in symptoms, and an increase in the lean. It then gets better again after a short while, but not back to normal. I have no idea what makes it flare up. I have seen an osteopath and a chiropracter, they have done some treatment but now say there is nothing they can do and I need to carry on and get on with it. They have said not to bother with an MRI, as they would not recommend surgery anyway, as my symptoms are quite mild. I can ride a bike, and cycle to work, but I am a runner and they have said no to running. My question then is how long will the antlagic lean take to go (8 months is a long time!), and why do I seem to relapse every few months? Do you think its worth going for an MRI, or not to bother as generally things are getting better?

    Thanks

    David

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    How do you know your disc prolapsed without an MRI? Antalgic leans most commonly are associated with a disc herniation but there are other disorders that can also cause antalgia. In my opinion, 8 months of an antalgic lean is an indication for an MRI.

    There are treatments other than surgery for antalgia (epidurals come to mind).

    Dr. Corenman

    Johns
    Member
    Post count: 5

    Thanks for the quick reply. Well, apparently all the symptoms I have showed have led the osteopath (who works for the National Health Service in their acute back pain clinic) and the chiropracter to think it was a prolapse. I had kind of taken their words for it, the chiropracter said that if I did have an MRI, it would likely show a prolapse, so not much had been gained. Its a bit different over here in the UK, but I could go and see my GP and its likely he would refer me for an MRI. I had hoped to stay away from anything being stuck in my back, but if thats whats necessary, I’ll have to get it done! 8 months looking like a question mark is not funny!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    In my opinion, unlike most people, you have the strength in your back to torque your body just enough to “get off of the nerve”. This malalignment is due most likely to a herniation. Just because you can alter your alignment to reduce your pain due to your strength does not mean this can be ignored. This antalgia is a problem and should not be shrugged off due to the low level of your pain.

    You should present your case to them stating that you cannot stand up straight and this is affecting your daily activities.

    Dr. Corenman

    Johns
    Member
    Post count: 5

    Thanks again for replying. I have just made an appointment to see my doctor, and I will tell him this. Hopefully they will be able to get to the bottom of it. Side note, ibuprofen seems to work very well in managing the pain when it starts, how does that benefit a nerve like this? i thought it was a muscle relaxant / anti inflammatory, just wondering why it works so well. Sorry for the questions! And I really appreciate the time you take to answer.

    Thanks

    David

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    Ibuprofen is an anti-inflammatory and not a muscle relaxant. See the new section on the website regarding “medications” under “treatments”.

    Dr. Corenman

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