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  • Holger
    Member
    Post count: 16

    Here is what I thought was a remarkable approach to prepare and help yourself for surgery. I believe no one likes the thought of being “under the knife” and I feel no different about my own upcoming ACDF surgery.

    According to one of his books, Dr. Mehmet Oz, famous cardiothoracic surgeon at Columbia University, music therapy prior to open heart surgery lessens the dose needed for medication to reach the same effect during the actual procedure. The patient is much more relaxed and less anxious and the outcome and recovery time is faster and easier.

    The music that seems to work for me is Liquid Mind which has been used already in VA Hospitals and other healthcare settings. As for me, I love to learn and I never stop learning new things and I just wanted to share this so this could maybe help you and your patients too in some way before surgery.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    I agree that music can reduce anxiety and help patients with preparations for surgery. It is however individually dictated. I have some patient who don’t want music but meditate beforehand. Some patients respond to humor very well which is one of my specialities.

    Other patients are so anxious and cannot relax with any outside stimulation. There is a medication given by IV that can help called Versed. This is an anti-anxiety medication that is given to almost every patient preoperatively and has a remarkable effect to calm and soothe.

    Dr. Corenman

    Holger
    Member
    Post count: 16

    Thanks for response. My grandma who recently passed away at 98 lived through two(!) World Wars in Germany always told me, humor is the best medicine. She was very wise and knew some really good jokes too some of which we can’t repeat here :-) I fully agree that humor works wonders.

    I hope I can ask for Versed prior to my surgery to make me calm down as well. I have read that it’s similar to Propofol which also treats postoperative nausea and vomiting. I am curious, what is your preferred drug for general anesthesia? It appears that there are hundreds to choose from.
    Again, thank you so much for your reply.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    Typically, the standard of care in most hospitals is IV Versed and Fentanyl (a pain mediation that is also short acting). Propofol is used to induce and continue anesthesia and can be used with other IV medications as well as anesthetic gas. I leave it to the anesthesiologist to determine the correct combinations and dosages but I make sure I have on the physician that I can trust to administer the anesthesia.

    Dr. Corenman

    Holger
    Member
    Post count: 16

    Thank you very much for the fast reply :-)

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