Vail Daily Features Vail Spine Surgeon, Dr. Corenman, in Part Two of Back Pain in Children

//Vail Daily Features Vail Spine Surgeon, Dr. Corenman, in Part Two of Back Pain in Children

Vail_DailyThe Vail Daily recently featured Part Two of Dr. Corenman’s aricle, Back Pain in Children. According to Dr. Corenman, children generally do not complain of back pain, but when they do, parents should heed their warning. For some children, pain is a result of several pain generators. Some of the more commonly seen generators are discussed in this feature.

The first disorder discussed in the article is Scheuermann’s disease. With this disorder, the growth plates in children are not as strong as normal and can fragment and fracture under load. These fractures are painful. The pain tends to be in the upper portion of the lower back and the spine region behind the chest area (thoracic spine) The second condition is isthmic spondylolysis. Unlike Scheuermann’s disorder, this condition normally occurs in the lowest level of the spine at L5-S1 (at the beltline). Isthmic spondylolysis is estimated to be found in one of every 20 adolescents and occurs with sports that require repeated extension (bending backwards) like gymnastics, football, tennis, diving and wrestling. Dr. Corenman also states that degenerative disc disease and herniated discs, while thought to be an adult problem, can also be found in children. These disorders are discussed in greater detail in the article.

See the full article, Diagnosing Back Pain in the Child Athlete (Part Two) of a two-part series.

You can also read Part One of the article here: Vail Spine Surgeon Writes About Back Pain in the Child Athlete

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Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.