Neck and Shoulder Pain

///Neck and Shoulder Pain
Neck and Shoulder Pain
Viewing 6 posts - 61 through 66 (of 74 total)
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  • AvatarBRONCOFAN1
    Participant
    Post count: 41

    Hi Dr. Corenman,

    Had a Flexion/Extension Xray and MRI done. The flexion / extension report stated no abnormality, I’m assuming I still have 2 MM of motion between the views although it wasn’t noted and I didn’t really see it reviewing the images myself (but I’ll admit I am a complete amateur!). I will see my doctor tomorrow, but I assume the radiologist indicating nothing of note is good news for the fusion status at C5-7.

    MRI main findings were loss of disc signal C2-3, C3-4, c4-5, and C7-t1. Reviewing the images myself this is certainly noticeable compared to the discs T1 and lower. All discs are of normal height, with minor bulges at C3-4 and C4-5. Also, C4-5 has uncovertebral hypertrophy, facet hypertrophy, and mild right neural foraminal narrowing.

    I am guessing either an ESI at C4-5 or facet blocks at that level are probably in order.. will update the forum once that’s decided!

    Would welcome any comments on the above, but the main question I have about the report: Is it common at my age (40) to have all those discs with signal loss? I must have really put my neck through a lot I suppose!

    Thanks,
    Kevin

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 6907

    Many individuals do have multilevel mild degenerative discs of no or only mild consequences. It sounds like you have a solid fusion at C5-7 or the radiologist (hopefully) would have called it. Where an injection would be placed would depend upon your symptoms.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarBRONCOFAN1
    Participant
    Post count: 41

    Hi Dr Corenman,

    Well, my spine doctor ordered a CT based on the flex – ex (did not like the amount of movement he was seeing. Picked up the report today and it indicated – no evidence of Osseous bridging is seen across the disc spaces. I assume that at 16 months out that means a non-fusion a appears to be both levels c5-6 and c6-7. Hardware is noted as not having any loosening. Other levels look good with only mild degeneration noted.

    Won’t see the doctor again for a bit but given the pain level I’m experiencing i have a feeling he’s going to suggest a posterior fusion…Any thoughts on that course of action?

    Thanks!

    Kevin

    AvatarBRONCOFAN1
    Participant
    Post count: 41

    Also did a quick Google search and found an NCBI article on this that indicated that even if a posterior revision was performed that all non-union fibrous tissue should be removed. Is that possible if using a posterior approach.. it doesn’t seem to make sense to me, so perhaps I misread the article?

    Kevin

    AvatarBRONCOFAN1
    Participant
    Post count: 41

    Hi Dr. Corenman,

    I should have searched the forum more carefully before posting my questions – found another thread where you indicated a posterior approach is probably best if angulation is ok and there is no stenosis (as is the case for me).

    I will update the forum once I’ve settled on a plan.

    Thanks!
    Kevin

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 6907

    If the non-union looks to be “trying to heal” (an assessment of the CT and X-rays) without malalignment or nerve compression, then a posterior fusion would be appropriate. If there is any residual compression or poor healing, an anterior redo fusion would be a better choice.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 6 posts - 61 through 66 (of 74 total)

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