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L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion
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TOPIC: L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion

L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion 2 years, 3 months ago #1732

Hello.
I had a MRI done last week and the results that the radiologist came back with stated: "L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion(without significant central canalicular stenosis and/or foraminal stenosis.) I also obtained an interactive copy of the MRI.
I stumbled upon your website and found it to be very informative. I'm gathering as much info and anecdotal evidence so I can find the right doctor and procedure for me. I am hoping to avoid surgery but will do what it takes for a full and lasting recovery.
Thanks for your time,
--Eric ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

Re: L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion 2 years, 3 months ago #1736

First- what are your symptoms? Degenerative discs can cause incapacitating symptoms or no symptoms at all. Back pain/ leg pain/ time of day/ association with activity?????

Dr. Corenman
Dr. Corenman

This answer is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for a diagnosis from a qualified professional. Do not try to diagnose or treat yourself based solely upon reading this material.

back pain forum • lower back pain forum • spine surgery forum • neck pain forum

Re: L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion 2 years, 3 months ago #1745

Thanks for the quick response.
I have low back pain always, 4 of 10, and it gets worse if I am in any fixed pose(sitting, standing) for even minutes it starts to get worse, 7 of 10. Laying down is the most comfortable for me but I still toss and turn all night.
After the 2nd session with a chiropractor I started getting knee pain, 4 of 10, which brought about the MRI. Most of the knee pain went away after a couple weeks of no chiropractor. Time of day and leg pain are not factors and activity doesn't cause anymore pain. I play racquetball, disc golf and volleyball regularly. I stopped lifting weights and doing pushups as both of those did cause more pain.
Thanks again,
--Eric
Last Edit: 2 years, 3 months ago by emckenzie.

Re: L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion 2 years, 3 months ago #1747

So generally the pain is static in regards to activity except lifting weights and pushups exacerbates the pain and lying down relieves the pain somewhat. You have a degenerative disc at L5-S1 with a central posterior disc herniation or "bulge". You can continue to participate in most recreational activities with some moderate pain that is tolerable.

I will assume that you have gone through a good Pilates physical therapy program and ergonomics education. The next step if that is the case is a series of epidural steroid injections to reduce the sensitivity of the nociceptors and medications like NSAIDs or membrane stabilizers to reduce inflammation or nerve transmission.

Because weights and pushups cause pain, your pain may be from facet syndrome. A consideration of facet blocks might be indicated (see website).

Dr. Corenman
Dr. Corenman

This answer is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for a diagnosis from a qualified professional. Do not try to diagnose or treat yourself based solely upon reading this material.

back pain forum • lower back pain forum • spine surgery forum • neck pain forum
Last Edit: 2 years, 3 months ago by Dr. Corenman.

Re: L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion 2 years, 3 months ago #1829

Hello again,
I did go through a physical therapy program that involved stretching but not pilates and I continue to stretch daily. I am willing to give pilates a try. Do you have any pilates videos that you recommend or reading that you suggest? I was explained the basics of ergonomics and have done some research myself but I am always willing to learn if you have any ergonomics education that you can point me to. What are your thoughts on spinal decompression in relation to DDD?
Thanks for your time.
--Eric

Re: L5-S1 degenerative disc disease with posterior midline disc protrusion 2 years, 3 months ago #1831

A therapy program should consist of strengthening the support muscles, conditioning these muscles to work for long periods (maintaining strength over a prolonged period) and stretching the supporting contracted ligaments and capsules. Ergonomics is the understanding of lifting mechanics and the trained avoidance of bad positioning that would put your back in jeopardy.

The "spinal decompression" machine is simply a traction machine. It does not put anything "back into place". I have no specific objection to these spinal decompression machines like the DMX 9000 except the "sales programs" associated with them. You do not need more than two "treatments" to find if they are effective for you personally. I personally think these machines are not that effective.

I have not as of yet placed significant time into a published rehabilitation program except in my books but I do have some videos that cover some of the basics of biomechanics. Look under the header: videos- television interviews and you will find some good information there.

Dr. Corenman
Dr. Corenman

This answer is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for a diagnosis from a qualified professional. Do not try to diagnose or treat yourself based solely upon reading this material.

back pain forum • lower back pain forum • spine surgery forum • neck pain forum
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